Who sends these “Minutes”? Part Two

January 3, 2016

 

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What Can I Do?

In addition to reading the Minutes, thinking about them, and using the ones that resonate with you, readers of Leadership Minutes can take action in two other ways. First, add to the conversation by writing and submitting a Leadership Minute of your own. Second, share your Leadership Minute with your colleagues and friends, and invite them to register to receive the Minutes in their own in-box.Yesterday’s Minute gave readers some background information about the Ross Leadership Institute. Today’s Minute will address the question: “What can I do?”

We hope you have seen that Leadership Minutes are plainly written, broadly applicable and adoptable ideas about some issue of importance to those who want to become better leaders.  We believe that to increase your leadership, you need to practice.   One might categorize the main themes around which Leadership Minutes are organized as: ethical leadership, building teams, increasing engagement, and achieving sustainable success. We have observed that the best leaders – Know Themselves, Know their Profession, and Know their People. Our Minutes usually center on those facets of leadership.  The Ross Leadership Institute welcomes reader submissions (with the understanding that, upon acceptance, the Institute gains all rights to the Minute and retains editorial control.)

If you would like to know how to organize a leadership event for your organization or enterprise, please contact the Executive Director of the Ross Leadership Institute, Debbie Johnson. She can be reached by e-mail (Debbie@rossleadership.com) or through our website (www.rossleadership.com).

If you or your organization would like to make a tax-deductible contribution to further the work of the Ross Leadership Institute, Debbie Johnson is the point of contact.

The Board and Founders of the Ross Leadership Institute – all volunteers – are committed to carrying on Paul Otte’s work, but we cannot do it alone – nor would Paul want us to do so. Paul was all about engagement, and that means spreading the word and being open to new ideas about leadership.  That’s why we need engagement by you, the readers of the Leadership Minute.

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Who sends these “Minutes”?

January 2, 2016

 

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Who sends these “Minutes”?

Many of the most faithful readers of our Leadership Minutes know little, if anything, about their publisher, the Ross Leadership Institute. As we begin another year, the Board and the Founders of the Ross Leadership Institute wish to introduce the Institute to its most important constituency.

The Ross Leadership Institute was founded in 2012 by Dr. Paul Otte, former President of Franklin University, who originated the concept of a center for leadership training. Paul understood that authentic leaders are always works-in-progress. As a life-long educator, he wanted to continue his work and enlisted the support of a group of his colleagues and, most importantly, of Elizabeth “Libby” Ross. Mrs. Ross and her husband had been long-time supporters of Paul’s work. Libby Ross made a modest financial contribution to Paul’s new venture. The Institute, by the way, would have been named for Mr. and Mrs. Ross whether or not there was a financial contribution. Paul held the Ross family in the highest regard because of their civic leadership and past contributions to many good works, including Paul’s.

To say that Paul “founded” the Ross Leadership Institute is something of an understatement. He was its driving force, inspiration, head cheerleader, chief cook and bottle washer. In short – without Paul Otte there would be no Ross Leadership Institute. We lost Paul late last year, but the momentum he established has been sufficient to continue his work.

The Ross Leadership Institute is a 501 (c) (3) organization that operates on a very lean budget, and is supported largely by volunteers. It exists to support the growth of men and women who want to be ethical, principled and effective leaders. Our “products” are the daily Leadership Minute you enjoy; periodic Leadership Institutes – workshops organized for other organizations as in-house leadership training; Leadership Hours – monthly presentations by a diverse group of leaders on the campus of Otterbein University; and books published through the Institute on a variety of leader-related topics.

All of the Ross Leadership Institute’s products are (or soon will be) available on or through our website.

Tomorrow – What can I do?

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US Sentencing Commission Guidelines for an Effective Compliance and Ethics Program – Provides Lessons for Good Ethics

January 1, 2016

 

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US Sentencing Commission Guidelines for an Effective Compliance and Ethics Program – Provides Lessons for Good Ethics

Today’s Leadership Minute was written by:
Bill Lhota, former CEO of COTA and AEP senior executive
Ross Leadership Institute Founder

I am frequently asked; what constitutes and effective Compliance and Ethics Program?

My response; Chapter Eight of the US Sentencing Commission Guidelines at  §8B2.1 Effective Compliance and Ethics Program spells out the criteria for an effective program.

Use the link below to access §8B2.1 of the Guidelines Manual:

http://www.ussc.gov/sites/default/files/pdf/guidelines-manual/2015/CHAPTER_8.pdf

The criteria presented in §8B2.1 applies to all organizations, large, and small; for profit and non-profit. However, the Guidelines provide that small organizations may tailor their program to meet their specific needs.

While §8B2.1 pertains to organizations there are numerous leadership lessons for good ethics to be gleaned from a careful reading of this section of the Guideline Lines.

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